Color Sudoku

After watching enough people work on sudoku number puzzles, it occurred to me that this logic game can be easily adapted to art by substituting the numbers for colors or symbols.

Color sudoku follows three basic rules:
1. Use all the color options in each box without repeating
2  Use all the color options in each row without repeating
3. Use all the color options in each column without repeating

Try a simple online symbol or color sudoku. If you have an iPod Touch or iPhone you can download color sudoku here. Or perhaps you may prefer a low-tech version such as the example featured below.

Since I love sharing – feel free to download the low-tech color version of sudoku that I created as an extension activity. I printed mine on tag board and laminated to keep clean.  I also wanted to keep the colors consistent between the game boards and the pieces so I printed out color sheets and cut them down into pieces that fit each puzzle.  Since the 4 color sudoku need larger pieces than the 6 color and 9 color, I keep those pieces separate in a zip lock bag.  Reuse a shallow class-pack type box to store the entire kit together.

Use the 4-color sudoku for younger students or to introduce the concept for the first time. Let the kids differentiate their own learning by choosing their own difficulty level.  I don’t use answer keys (if you follow the rules, you know when you have found the solution)  - although you could easily create your own by writing in the color names on an extra printout by solving yourself (or have a student do it for you).

4 Color Sudoku: (Beginner)
4-Color Sudoku #1
4-Color Sudoku #2

4-Color Sudoku #3
4-Color Sudoku #4

6 Color Sudoku: (Beginner/Intermediate)
6- Color Sudoku #1
6- Color Sudoku #2
6- Color Sudoku #3
9 Color Sudoku: (Intermediate)
9 Color Sudoku #1
9 Color Sudoku #2
9 Color Sudoku #3
9 Color Sudoku #4
9 Color Sudoku #5
9 Color Sudoku #6
9 Color Sudoku: (Advanced)
9 Color Sudoku #7 (advanced)
9 Color Sudoku #8 (advanced)
9 Color Sudoku #9 (advanced)
Color-Sheets to print: (Cut down to fit sudoku puzzles)
Black
Gray
Green
Light Blue
Orange
Pink
Purple
Red
Yellow

Idea update 3/18/10: Print out duplicate sudoku game cards so students can challenge each other to see who can finish card first.

Reader suggested update 8/24/13: Blank Sudoku Cards for the students to create themselves.  Great idea Amy!

4 Color Blank Card
6 Color Blank Card
9 Color Blank Card

Theresa McGee

Hello! My name is Theresa McGee and I am a National Board Certified Art Teacher and Apple Distinguished Educator teaching in Hinsdale, Illinois. My curriculum is structured around creative thinking and technology integration into the learning process. I have authored eighteen articles for the Tech4ArtEd Column in SchoolArts Magazine and several iTunes U courses for professional development. I've presented at the state and national levels including several online webinars for art educators. In 2010, I was awarded Illinois Elementary Art Educator of the Year and in 2011 I was awarded the national PBS Teacher Innovator award. I love to share ideas that contribute to the art education profession!

10 Comments

  • March 15, 2010

    Jean King

    There’s an app for that! Check the iTunes app store for Color Sudoku from Mighty Mighty Good Games.

  • March 15, 2010

    Jean King

    I love the way that you’ve set this up! Great idea!

  • [...] Sudoku. Based on the original, I developed this color logic game for my students. Download this color sudoku game for free. Computer [...]

  • [...] Color Sudoku [...]

  • March 29, 2011

    Betsy

    Wow! These are awesome! I am going to get them set up in my room ASAP. I told my friends about them, and they look forward to playing with them too! Thanks for the idea!

  • August 27, 2011

    Janine

    Brilliant! I’ve been looking for something like this. Thanks for sharing. I will use this.

  • August 22, 2013

    Amy

    This is great! Thanks for the printables. I’ll be using them as a children’s library activity. Just wondered if you’d be up for adding the empty grids as printables too, so that kids could try making their own puzzles? (I’m not tech-savvy enough to do it myself).

  • Hillary Andrlik + Theresa McGee
    August 24, 2013

    Theresa McGee

    Great idea to have the kids create their own Amy! I just added blank ones (but left the color options at the bottom). Have fun!

  • September 12, 2013

    Amy

  • October 18, 2013

    Jamie

    This is so amazing! I printed these out as soon as I saw them and my kids started working on them right away for a family Friday night activity. Love it!

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