Australian Didgeridoo

I have always been fascinated by the beauty of Indigenous Australian art.  Even more impressive is how the art is combined with a functional instrument. The traditional didgeridoo instrument is made from a Eucalyptus tree branch or trunk that has been hollowed out by termites. Listen to the sound this work of art creates.

Image Source:Didjshop.com

Discussion Questions:

1.  What kind of sound did you expect to hear?  Why?

2.  How is this instrument like other instruments you are familiar with? Can you think of an another instrument that was created by a visual artist? Do you think changing the shape of the didgeridoo would change the sound?

3.  Why do you think the Indigenous Australians created this musical instrument?

Theresa McGee

Hello! My name is Theresa McGee and I am a National Board Certified Art Teacher and Apple Distinguished Educator teaching in Hinsdale, Illinois. My curriculum is structured around creative thinking and technology integration into the learning process. I have authored eighteen articles for the Tech4ArtEd Column in SchoolArts Magazine and several iTunes U courses for professional development. I've presented at the state and national levels including several online webinars for art educators. In 2010, I was awarded Illinois Elementary Art Educator of the Year and in 2011 I was awarded the national PBS Teacher Innovator award. I love to share ideas that contribute to the art education profession!

1 Comment

  • October 14, 2008

    Jean

    Didgeridoos can be made out of pvc pipe. Here’s a link to making them: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Didgeridoo-out-of-PVC-Pipe
    It’s interetesting to think about how physical shape changes sound. Iin this case, the length of the didgeridoo changes the pitch. “Sculpting Sounds!”

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